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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  June 21, 2016 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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brussels, or erase the fear of what might come next. >> ahead, this hour, a defiant test fire, voluntary missiles, prompting outrage around the world. >> on the eve of this historic, see if she remains part of the eu. >> what he would do to america. >> newsroom l.a. starts right
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now. >> two missiles into the sea of japan. >> the first one failed, after flying ai hundred miles, is that considered a success? >> officials have not said idea it is a success or fallir. it appeared to slow further. this is number 6 for north korea. it is one that north carolina
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has been in a rush to perfect. it has tried six times, it is a capability that she wants her to even if they are failures, john. >> looter, with the lowerem. it takes all, it is a
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. it is the last day of campaigning, whether the uk should stay in the european union. >> reporter: this was, by far, the most liey and fiery behand in front of a large audience. that is the way it played out. three speakers remain. taked about immigrant, economics. bor boris johnson said the opposite. >> i can't think of the single
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use. pr vents the eu, i am afraid, a job destroying engine, across south. >> jumping by the way it seemed to have thankful. the rehe laid out the position, as far as nato is. >> all of them say, if the
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countries kreesht, we will be you this idea of stay take back kroirth. >> it rising star, the labor party, was the stakd to death on the he said he was worried about
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the tone of the campaign. >> i remember so she both love for her children, her family, she moved things with spirit. she wasn't infer at all. she wanted to make the world a better place, contribute, and . the race for if the white
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believes now, donald trump would be better at handling the calling him reckless and dangerous for the nation. >> two days ago, he said and i quote. "i am going to do for the country, what i did for you're business. >> written a lot of boeks about business. they all seem to end at if here, clint ton not. >> they tr living in a lot of
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tru trump -- >> my ties are made in china, i will say this t the hats make america great again. i searched long and hard to find somebody who made the hats in this country. >> it is just business, it is just business. >> this is his strength. there is a reason, hillary clinton is throwing the i think
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she will have a tough time doing that, at the end of the day. she hads never created a cot. the voters indiana, are you concerned that these lables, the insults, that trump throws at his opponent, are sticking. when you look at the unfavorability, it isn't helping her credibility either. >> her unfavorable is a
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secreta -- >>ing in early, defining her opponent, hitting although and often tripping over himself. romney got rich crushing the little guy. trumped businessmen to trump the president. >> bankrupted his companies, not one contractors took heavy losses. donald trump came out fine. here is what he said about one
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of those. i figured it was the bank's problem, not fine. >> it seems, he is campaigning it. i think jobs and the economy, we are seeing a shift. m monmouth, hillary we are seeing a shift. part of that, the attacks. painting the picture, this is a guy who is a tag clothing. he committed krout, and got -- >> if he doesn't resgan control of the narrative, what they did
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to mitt romanczukny. >> he say blue carer. he created more joining than he work. she has a more do you think, that clinton, on average, by seven points. with all the resources, shouldn't -- once barack obama, and those endorse. we are starting to see young peoples. i think we have seen a transition.
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as long as the play. >> he watches us all the time. >> he watches us all the time. >> the suant he used to use that kay from wall street. and remind bernie sanders. just would take us back about he was. ril the that will not happen on my wampt. >> this is one area where hillary could be on thin ice?
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>> her wall street connor was like, you can't chose the agent pool rhett rick. brought this up. >> she has been in the public eye for months, there is nothing out there. it will be an extension of obama. will hillary, you don't. >> this isn't the first time.
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he was a conspir asy -- he says these regulations, and. >> this is moments, is right good to see you. >> more from the race for the whus house. campaign's does the latest
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sgr welcome back, donald trump is working in overdrive, trying to reassure republicans that he is running a legitimate presidential campaign. >> this comes after numbers from the presidential nominee. >> despite a lifetime spending years cutting bills, don't worry, says trump. a good we raced a lot of nom. hillary finished their 42 million in the bank. other glaring, and thire sa
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resnident of that show. knowing that the appeals for donors are just sgng. i would put up my own -- >> they will eventually yee on, if they don't, it can everyone's century over the length of o our -- >> the candidate was out suring up support among evangelical
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leaders. >> i have so no, to kr incredible children, and so many other things. even again ris is most. the website won't be up and running for a couple of days. >> joining us now. he worked for mitt rom me. in comparison.
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that sparked at hark i want to show you some of those listed governor christie on mayday, and fosted to scale back his ex -- he is not beholden to major donors, isn't this going to plan well with his base? >> i think it the he wants to being it will be hard to koe have been him to put up the money, if he is fnt.
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>> she is getting the money from the special i have never done it before. i think i would be good at it. >> can you going to continue? >> i may. ir can do whatever i want. she will spend 1.2 million overa on campaign by self he is
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getting it digital and tv advertising, that is the best way for all of those reasons, i think that i is there is a lot skepticism. i spent time with a lot of major donors in the last several weeks, they say the same thing. they don't believe donald trump can win. they are thing ed there is this
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new stop trump movement underway, the post is including, this includes the support of 400 delegates. that way, weeks before the convention. >> i think there are a lot of divisions, that analysis is right. the republican national convention is a delegate driven convingz and process. enough decide donald trump should not be the presumption. nacould vehicle the ache there
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are a lot of people unsoefed now, as a thanks for coming on the program. >> thank you. >> the countdown to the usa's even if it's just for a night.
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. welcome back, you are watching cnn new itsroom live. >> the interest the sea of japan, south korea said the first one failed, after flies 100 miles, the second missile, two hours later, is still being investigated. >> hillary clinton said donald trump would be dangerous. 51% of voters believe that trump would be better at handling the economy. >> trump is short on fundraising money. compared to clinton's $42
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million. he spent 17% of his campaign money on his own businesses. >> we are into the final hours whether the uk should remain in the european union. how deeply divided the country is. >> believe that a not even the clinical trials. the eu is a job-destroying entity. you can see it in southern europe, and in this country as
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well. the prime minister asking people to see what it will have on future generations. the neighbors go on making important decisions without british involvement. >> we don't quit. we take a lead. we make a difference, we get things done. >> live to london now, and the correspondent, thanks. damaged goods, regardlessrefere. >> he could be. it depends on the result. it is far, far closer than david cameron expected it to be. at this point, he was hoping to have a comfortable margin going into tomorrow's vote. he would come home with a comfortable win, and put the issue to bed and move on.
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he could say to the rebels, you have had your referendum, that is not what happened. this is really, really close it is 50/50. the remains side are flight favorites, only slightly favorable. 14.05. the margins are tiny. it is all about turn-out now. >> it start wide a campaign promise. at the time, it seemed like a risk move. off the immigration party. some say he shouldn't offer this referendum in the first place. it is irresponsible. where do you stand on that? >> it is looking back on hindsight. david cameron, he was described
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as a political genius. he somehow beaten the odds, seen off the labor party, had the first conservative majority in 20 years..
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and that is what we shall
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do. good to speak with you. thanks for coming in. >> no problem. >> so europe is looking on nervously as the brexit vote fast approaches. >> and we hit the streets of paris to find out how the french feel about the debate raging across the channel. >> summer in the city of light means outdoor cafes, selfies on the siene, most parisian are nervous. >> i'm worried about it. i think it would be a mistake for this cohesion to disappear. >> even if it's difficult, i think we have something very nice. >> at newspaper key of course, it's portrayed as a marriage on the rocks. at least on the continent, few seem ready to divorce. some in the french press
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consider it unbelievable that they would leave to eu. the french economy minister told lemond that britain would come a small isolated island. while prime minister manual vows said leaving the eu would be a mistake. a family feud is deepening. >> you don't want to see the disintegration of europe and what it can lead to. we have memory of the past. >> french arthur dominic moise say they have a responsibility. >> a responsibility that goes much beyond great britain, much beyond europe. it is the west at large that is at stake. >> this increasingly fractured europe is reflected in the views of football fans here for euro
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2016. these men from northern island say they -- ireland say they want britain to leave. >> northern ireland and britain are putting more money in than we're getting out of europe. >> german fans want britain to remain. >> they have to take into account that the economic pierre will decrease. unemployment will increase. >> britain, stay. >> why? >> because it will be a disaster for all europe. >> by the end of this week, british football teams may still be in jump but their country could be on the way out. will rippley, cnn, paris. >> all right. next on "news room l.a.," four different gun control bills have failed to pass the senate. why some hope a new republican proposal could bring different results. [ male announcer ] love drama? don't be a yes man.
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. the u.s. attorney general is offering $1 million to florida in the wake of the orlando terror attack. loretta lynch traveled to the city tuesday with emergency funding to help the state. she met with some of the survivors and got an upset from law enforcement. >> omar martin went to the club hours before with going. he may have been checking club security. >> the attacks still fresh on people's minds a republican senator is brucing a new gun control proposal. susan collins' bill would block gun sales to anyone in the united states on a narrow list of possible terrorist.
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>> today the senate rejected four gun control measures. the national rifle association called the proposal unconstitutional. >> joiningin us now is richard feldman, the former regional director of the nra. thank you for your time. america holds a distinction when it comes to, you know, to mass shootings and daily gun violence. i mean, it's a uniquely american phenomenon. there are more gun owners in the united states than anywhere else in the world. more than 30,000 people die every year from gun deaths. we have a graphic for our audience. the u.s. has way more gun homicides than any country in the world. so my question to you, richard, why is that? why does america stand alone when it comes to gun violence? isn't the common denominator the
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availability of guns? >> that's like saying if you lived in a society without oobl automobiles, there would be no people run down or having drunk drivers because people have no cars. >> but you're comparing apples to oranges. the sole purpose of a gun is to kill. that's it. >> really? really? is that -- you mean i own all those guns and i'm intending to kill people? that's the sole purpose? do you really mean that? >> that's the purpose -- or hunt. >> i own firearms and i use them for sport, for recreation. i use them for self defense, but the purpose -- >> and what do you do with the guns when you use it for sport? >> oh, i trap shoot and i skeet. i go to the range and i punch
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holes in paper targets. it's a lot of fun. i collect them. i've never shot anyone. mine guns haven't got up in the middle of the night and went out and shot and killed anyone. they're under my control. i'm the responsible individual and yes, my guns have been used by me to protect myself on several occasions. >> so what should the focus be, then, if it shouldn't be guns what should it be? mental health issues? >> i'm not saying there's no -- you know, involvement in firearms. i'm saying what are the alternatives. there are a hundred million fire arm owners in this country today. you're not going to take the people's guns away from them. so if those guns are out there, how are we going to do a better job of keeping the guns out of the hands of people who shouldn't have them.
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background checks have a purpose and they've been useful to a degree. the mistake we make in this country is when we prevent someone from obtaining a fire arm from one source, we congratulate ourselves as though we've succeeded in preventing them from getting guns from another source. 600,000 -- >> right. you talk about expanded background checks -- excuse mow. just let me jump in. you worked with the nra and we know the nra has pushed back and is oppose ed to background checks. although a poll has shown that 85% of americans support expanded background checks. but the congress seems to be answering to the nra, a very powerful lobby group than the voice of the people. why is congress not passing measures that would expand
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background checks? >> we don't run this country on the base is of polls, number one. number two, the only poll that ever matters in american politics is the poll on the first tuesday after the first monday in november. that's the important poll. >> and you say this country is not run by polls exempt for in a general election that's coming up in november. i think critics would argue that when you talk about running the country it seems like the nra has a strong hold on the people who do run the country. >> you talk about nra as though they were an individual. the nra is a group of 500,000 dues paying members. when you disagree with a group that plays the game very effectively in politics and normer congressman barney frank has said this many times when you downplay the role that they
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have and the fact that they're very good at working the -- this democracy of ours, what one is really saying is i don't like democracy if i can't win. when you have an opponent who is better at this process than you are, you can't say, gee, that's unfair, they're too powerful, they're too strong. no. your job in a democracy is then to be able to do it back again and be better at it and not whine and complain. >> richard feldman, we appreciate your time and your perspective. thanks so much more r for joining us. >> thank you. >> next on "news room, l.a.," combatting wildfires. the latest in a moment. be the you who doesn't cover your moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. be the you who shows up in that dress. who hugs a friend. who is done with treatments that don't give you clearer skin.
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. crews in southern california are dealing with another waging wildfire, this one in the san gabriel canyon. >> clouds of smoke could be seen from nearby dodger stadium. the fish fire is still growing,
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officials say. >> meteorologist pedram joins us now. >> there's a couple of fires as you said. this is something over the course of the next couple of days will be something to watch. take a look. not just confined to skae. but across did western states. you have the predominant fires across portions of los angeles area. 2500 acres, zero percent containment. you see how we got here. the record temperatures in yeent days, the hottest temperatures in the world, the top two, have been across eastern california and the mohave desert. death valley comes in at 123 today. only cooling off to the low 90s
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in the evening. the soil moisture is sitting at around 10% of normal. bone dry temperatures. we have a car that went off the road in an accident and sparked a fire. you look at the terrain. this is why this is such a difficult fire to contain. about a 10 degree slope increase, your fire containment speed spreading at twice a rapid scale and no slope sort of fire situation. the marine influence is coming back in the picture here the next couple of days. we expect the temperatures to want to begin to cool off around the sherpa fire region. we're talking the mid 20s celsius there. that's going to hip the fire situation across southern california with improvement on the coast of that area. guys? >> dry and hot as always.
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it's fire season now in southern california. >> some humidity coming. >> something to look forward to. >> thanks, rob. >> thanks, guys. >> i'm john vos. >> and i'm anne walker. we'll be back with another hour of news right after this. calling all go-getters. all providers. all self-motivated self-starters. drive with uber and put a dollar sign in front of your odometer. like this guy. technically i'm a cook. sign up here. drive a few hours a day. make $300 a week. actually it's a little bit more than that. that's extra buy-you-stuff money. or buy-them-stuff money. calling all early risers, nine-to-fivers and night owls. with uber-a little drive goes a long way. start earning this week. go to uber.com/drivenow don'tlive in tokyo. when you airbnb, you have your own home. so, live there.
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the heated debate over whether to stay or leave the eu. final campaigning ahead of britain's big decision. and north korea and kim jong unfiring off more missiles. he calls her crooked hillary. how clinton is using trump's business record against him. hello, everyone. and welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm amara walker. >> and i'm john vause. this is "cnn newsroom," live from los angeles. it is the last day of
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campaigning before the uk's pivotal vote about whether to remain in the european union. polls suggest it is too close to call. just under 46.5 million people have registered to vote. former mayor boris johnson leads the leave campaign and he's touring the country wednesday trying to sway undecided voters, pushing to remain as prime minister david cameron, and he urge the voters to think of brexit's negative economic impact on future generations. >> the final heated debate between the two sides took place on tuesday night. >> nic robertson reports thousands attended at london's wembley arena. >> reporter: this was by far the most lively and fiery debate so far. it was held in the sports arena at wembley in front of a live audience of about 6,000 people. it was always going to have with the cheers and the boos, it was always going to have something of an atmosphere of a sporting event, and that's the way that it played out for the best part. there were three speakers for
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remain, three speakers for leave. they talked about immigration. they talked about security. they talked about economics. boris johnson, the former mayor of london, taking on the british prime minister david cameron's claims that britain will be better off in the european union. boris johnson saying exactly the opposite. >> the remain side cannot think of a single one of the eu's multitude of -- the eu is, i'm afraid, a job destroying engine. you can see it all across southern europe, and you can see it in this country as well. >> now, the whole debate lasted about two hours, and it felt like a debate of two halves. judging by the way that the audience reacted listening to the cheers and the boos, the first half seemed to go with the leave campaign. the remain cam sane seemed to get the second half. sadiq kahn, who took over
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recently from boris johnson, he laid out the position saying that as far as the united states is concerned, as far as the european union is concerned, as far as nato is concerned, britain is safer and better off, more secure inside the european union. >> in fact, all of them are saying we're safer together. >> and all of them are also saying that as long as the european union keeps twrrying t copy what nature does, if the countries across europe are not paying their 2% of the gdp, which is the nature contribution, we will be weakening it. >> don't quit. why are you a quitter? we're better than that. we can do it. >> reporter: you could hear some of the cheers there for sadiq kahn as he was speaking. and this idea of stay and fight, he was echoing what david cameron, the british prime minister, had said earlier in the day. that seems to be the message that they want to resonate with the public at the moment. the remain campaign going for this stay and fight inside your,
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and the leave campaign saying take back control and leave. a very fiery debate. nick rockerson, cnn, london. turning to another story we are following, north korea launched two intermediate range missiles from its eastern coast into the sea of japan. south korea says the first one failed after flying 150 kilometers wednesday morning. the second missal is still being investigated. >> north korea has tried four other times since april to test this type of missile. as a precaution. japan's self-defense forces are on high alert. >> an expert on north korea is here is joining us now from seoul. thank you for doing so. i want to talk about these two missile tests. first one failed. the second one is under investigation. it flew furtherer, 250 miles. are you concerned about the second launch? >> well, i'm concerned about all of the launches, of course.
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this missile is a road mobile missile, so it's very difficult to track. it has an estimated range of about 3,500 kilometers, maybe 4,000 kilometers. so that would be put guam within its range and other u.s. bases in the pacific, all of japan. and these flight test failures are part of the normal development process, and they've been going at this pace very rapidly to work out the problems with the missile. >> it seems like the north korean regime, though, is in some kind of rush, you know, to perfect this technology. why are we seeing this series of missile tests? i mean this would be number six for this year when it comes to intermediate range missiles. what do you make of that? how do you read into that? >> well, it is quite striking the rapidity of the flight tests. if you look at any missile development program since world war ii under the nazis with the v-2 program, all programs have a number of failures. they have to go through that
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process to work out the problems, go back and fix the engineering issues. and north korea has been doing this very rapidly. it's somewhat surprising because you would have to work out the problems before it would be time for a flight test. but they tested on april 15th, the 28th, may 31st, and then this morning. so it shows that this is very important to the regime. >> yeah. what's also striking, our paula hancocks was pointing out that kim young eun, who has only been in power for four years, has launched 27 missile tests while his father, a stark difference. he was, you know -- he was in power for 18 years and only had 18 missile tests under his rein. so significantly more tests under kim jong-un. we've heard reports and speculation from korea watchers that there anyway be a power struggle that's been going on within the regime. i mean do you see this, you know, signals as kim jong unis feeling more and more insecure about his hold on power?
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>> well, i'm not so sure about that. authoritarian dictatorships inherently are unstable, and dictators have to do some things to stay in power, but they do have autonomy on other issues. and this nuclear and missile program under kim jong-un is a very, very high priority. he is pushing this. it's part of his identity to push this what they call this line, this dual development of nuclear weapons and the economy. so this is something they want to deploy because they believe it has a number of benefits to the regime. >> how do you expect the world to respond to this and particularly the people -- the nations in the region, including japan and south korea? >> well, this violates u.n. security council resolutions. any launch using ballistic missile technology is a violation.
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north korea is becoming more isolated. they've been placed under a number of sanctions including financial sanctions that makes it very difficult for them to carry out international trade and economic transactions. so they are going to start feeling the pinch of these sanctions throughout this year. they're entering a period now where there are food shortages or the lean season before the fall harvest. also over the next month or so, the anniversary of the start of korean war on june 25th to the end of the korean war on july 27th, they call it this month of anti-imperialism. so they will ratchet up the rhetoric against the u.s. they might engage in some kind of provocative action to show their strength. and always that has the danger of causing some kind of problem or es allocation that could turn into a military conflict. >> lots of worries, of course, surrounding this. good to have you on the program.
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thanks for your time. >> my pleasure. hillary clinton says donald trump as president would be reckless and dangerous for the economy. >> the presumptive democratic nominee took shots at her republican counterpart saying he would bankrupt the u.s. like he did to his casinos. here's brianna keilar. ♪ >> reporter: hillary clinton hitting donald trump on his experience as a businessman. >> he's written a lot of books about business. they all seem to end at chapter 11. [ laughter ] >> reporter: taking aim at him for going into bankruptcy with four of his corporations and for once calling himself the king of debt. >> the king of debt has no real plan for making college debt payable back or making college debt-free. this is a crisis that affects so many of our people.
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he has no credible plan for rebuilding our infrastructure apart from the wall that he wants to build. >> reporter: but trump is embracing the moniker, tweeting, i am the king of debt. that has been great for me as a businessman, but is bad for the country. i made a fortune off of debt. will fix u.s. many voters agree. in a new cnn/orc poll, when asked who would better handle the economy, 51% of those polled said trump. clinton trailing him by eight points. her campaign is trying to change that, putting up a new website in conjunction with her economic speech, the art of the steal dot biz, a play on his best selling book the art of the deal, and releasing a video about trump's unsuccessful business ventures. >> have you ever heard of trump steaks? >> you know what? take a look at trump steaks. >> whatever happened to trump airlines? >> trump travel, trump ice. >> trump magazine, which folded. trump world magazine, which also
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folded. >> and trump mortgage. >> reporter: but as clinton trails trump on handling of the economy on polls, she's crushing him with fund-raising with $42 million in the bank to trump's $1.3 million. the latest cnn poll also shows voters see clinton as having the better temperament to serve as president by a 24-point margin. clinton today seeking to connect those doubts with putting trump in charge of the u.s. economy. >> just like he shouldn't have his finger on the button, he shouldn't have his hands on our economy. >> and you heard brianna keilar there talk about clinton's anti-trump website. well, trump is also hitting back. >> his campaign said it's also launching a new site. lyin', crook ed hillary.com. it will be up and running in a couple days, they say. in washington, the chances for the latest bipartisan gun deal after the orlando mass shooting looks really unlikely. >> on monday, the senate failed
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to pass four gun measures. lawmakers were visibly upset afterwards. >> then on tuesday, the national rifle association says it oh poes a measure by susan collins. her home would ban gun sales to possible terrorists. right now she doesn't have the endorsement of leader from either party despite so many saying they want some kind of change. >> all of us are united in our desire to getting something significant done on this vital issue. surely the terrorist attacks in san bernardino and in orlando that took so many lives are a call for compromise, a plea for bipartisan action. >> monty frank is the founder of team 26, a group of cyclists who over the years have ridden 400
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miles to washington from newtown connecticut. the group was formed after the massacre at sandy hook elementary. monty, did you think that after almost four years since elementary children were murdered and countless other mass shootings that this later bipartisan bill which may or may not pass the senate, may or may not pass the lower house, would be the only significant gun reform that congress is actually taking? >> well, we knew when we started that this was going to be a long haul and a long journey, but we're in it for the long haul. you know, we've seen significant progress on the state level, and congress has been slow to act. but keep in mind that, you know, this is a senate that can't even do its job and hold hearings on supreme court nominees. you know, something simple as that that's called for in the constitution. it is hard to expect that they would actually do their job and take measures into account to
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try to keep us safer. so, you know, we're going to keep pressing and if congress refuses to do its job, i think it's incumbent on the american people to change members of congress. >> one of the criticisms of this build, the so-called no fly, no bylaw, which is being debated, is the lack of due process for anyone actually gets onto that no fly list or that terror list. this is what republican senator lindsey graham had to say. >> to my friends at the nra, i understand your concern about denying somebody the right to buy a gun. that's a constitutional right. but every right, whether speech or buying a weapon or any other constitutional right has boundaries on it. and i am far more concerned that the people on this list would buy a gun and kill as many people as they could with it if they bought it. so that's where i come out. i hope we can pass this. let's put it this way. if we can't pass this, it truly is a broken system up here.
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>> truly is a broken system up here. so if this does not get through, then what? >> well, i think they ought to pass legislation that will protect us rather than folks on the no fly list from acquiring we weapons of mass murder. we've seen what occurred in san bernardino and in orlando, and unfortunately it's going to continue to occur. but, you know, those are only two mass shootings. there have been over 300 mass shootings since what occurred here in sandy hook. and every weekend there are 26, 50 people killed in chicago alone. so, you know, we've got a much larger problem on our hands. so i think it's going to take not just passing measures that will protect those in the no fly zone from acquiring firearms, but there really needs to be a more comprehensive strategy in
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place on a federal level in order to make us all safe in our movie theaters, our nightclubs, our schools, et cetera. >> let's just talk about baby steps here. if this compromise bill, this bipartisan bill put forward by susan collins, if it does actually pass, if it does get voted through, could this potentially be a crack in the glass, if you like? it might just take this one piece of legislation to get through, to simply change the entire narrative here. >> i think it's a start. you know, i think americans need to see, like they've seen in connecticut and new york and other states, that we're not after grabbing all the guns. that we want to take reasonable measures in order to protect americans. and that still can be done in respect to second amendment and what it says at the same time. so if the first step is to make sure that those on the no-fly list are not able to acquire assault weapons and other
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weapons that can be used to kill many americans, then i think that's a good first start and hopefully cooler heads will prevail. and the senate will do its job and pass measures to protect us. >> monte, good to speak with you. thank you so much. >> thank you very much. we have new details on the orlando terror attack just ahead. what the gunman did in the hours before the shooting rampage. also dueling fires here in southern california, scorching acre after acre. how crews plan to taking the raging flames. that's in a moment.
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congrat... picture from mars looks great. it's about time business communications caught up. go from an audio call to a video conference with the push of a button. vonage. business grade. people friendly. some images of the fires in southern california, and crews are continuing to work to try and contain those blazes. >> on monday, another fire sprang up in the san gabriel canyon, quickly scorching about 1,500 acres. stephanie elam tells us what crews are doing to put out those growing flames.
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>> reporter: -- getting water and then dropping it on the flames here. the fish fire and also the reservoir fire, they're two fires burning just east of los angeles county that are about two miles apart. they expect them to merge at some point, so they are treating them as one big fire at this point. the issue here, though, is because of the low humidity and the high heat, they are really strapped across the state. six fires are burning, and so therefore they're splitting up resources to tackle these fires. here where we are in duarte, the fires are basically burning across the street for some homes, but the firefighters have been out there tackling any hot spots that they see to make sure they bring those fires as the fire continues to burn up into the wilderness of the angeles national forest. what they're concerned about is if the winds push these to the west, there could be more
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communities forced into evacuation conditions. there have been 770 homes that have been evacuated because just too close to the flames but it all depends on the wind and what happens over the next few hours. john and amara. >> our thanks to stephanie elam for that report. we're going to turn now to the orlando massacre. investigators say orlando gunman omar mateen was inside the pulse nightclub several hours before the terror attack. >> they think he may have been checking the club's security. details now from ed lavandera. >> reporter: omar mateen was angry as he packed a bag with his guns and then made the two-hour drive from his home to the pulse nightclub in orlando. that's what law enforcement sources say noor salman, mateen's wife, has told investigators. salman says she pleaded with mateen not to leave and grabbed him by the arm. she says she didn't know he was planning to kill dozens of people at the club. she also never called police to report what was happening. law enforcement sources also say the day before the attack,
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mateen purchased three plane tickets for himself, his wife, and child to fly to california. on tuesday, attorney general loretta lynch visited the shooting site but refused to say if criminal charges will be brought against salman. are you convinced that omar mateen's wife did not know about this attack, or should she have done more to stop it? >> well, we're not going to speak about anyone else's role in this right now while we're investigating the matter. we are trying to learn everything we can about mateen and all the people in his ambit in the days and weeks and months leading up to this attack. >> reporter: investigators are using mateen's cell phone and surveillance video inside the club to build a timeline of his movements in the hours before the deadly rampage. law enforcement sources tell cnn mateen showed up at the pulse nightclub earlier in the evening, paid the entry fee, and obtained a wrist band. he may have been checking the building's security that night. mateen left the club, came back two hours later, and unleashed the violent shooting spree.
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investigators are trying to figure out what mateen was doing during those two hours. >> that's why we're asking for anybody and everybody that's had any contact with this individual to come forward so we can piece that information together. >> reporter: attorney general lynch says investigators are still working to determine whether mateen acted out solely as a self-radicalized extremist or if he was driven by homophobia. >> we do feel that as we continue to build a timeline and a chronology and to build his life, that we will be able to determine this. i cannot tell you definitively that we will ever narrow it down to one motivation. >> reporter: investigators have finished collecting evidence at the pulse nightclub. the roads have opened up. and a small memorial of flowers and tributes is already being left under the club's marquis. ed laughen dara, cnn, orlando, florida. an american teenager is under arrest for attempting to provide material support to isis and travel overseas to join the terror organization. >> fbi agents took 18-year-old
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acram mousse lay into custody in indiana. they say he was trying to board a bus to new york where he had a scheduled flight to morocco and then head to isis-controlled territory. if convicted. he faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. argentina is heading to the copa america finals. the top ranked team defeated the u.s. 4-0 in the semifinals on tuesday. >> messi, who many consider the best player, says argentina's record with the 55th career goal. argentina will meet -- cnn's state of the race with kate bolduan. for everyone else, donald trump is getting ready to het back at his democratic rival. his planned speech on taking place at hillary clinton. a heated debate ahead of britain's biggest decision in a generation. see the fireworks and hear from people about a brexit from the
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european union. don'don't go to la.
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they found out who's been who? cking into our network. guess. i don't know, some kids in a basement? you watch too many movies. who? a small business in china. a business? they work nine to five. they take lunch hours. like a job? like a job. we tracked them. how did we do that? we have some new guys defending our network. new guys? well, they're not that new. they've been defending things for a long time. [ digital typewriting ] it's not just security. it's defense. bae systems.
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welcome back, everybody. you're watching "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. just gone 11:30 here on tuesday night. i'm john vause. >> i'm amara walker. north korea launched two intermediate range missiles. south korea says the first one failed after flying 150 kilometers on wednesday. that's about 90 miles. the second one, fired about two hours later, that still being investigated. just a day before people in the uk start voting on whether the nation should stay in the european union. 6,000 spectators attended a debate at wembley arena. three speakers for the leave
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campaign squared off against three for the remain campaign. brazil's army now says it was forced to shoot and kill a jaguar that had just been displayed at the olympic torch relay. it happened after one of the big cats escaped from its handlers after the flame made a stop at a zoo. an investigation is now under way. the race for the white house now and a cnn/orc poll finds 51% of voters believe donald trump would be better at handling the economy compared to hillary clinton. >> clinton is challenging that notion and pointing out all of trump's fiscal failures, calling him reckless and dangerous for the country. she says the u.s. economy would fall apart under him. now, trump is already firing insults right back at clinton. he says he will address her, quote, failed policies and bad judgment on wednesday. >> joining us now, democratic strategist dave jacobson, republican consultant john
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thomas. thanks for coming back. let's take a look at this assault hillary clinton launched on tuesday. this is really telling because she's going after trump's biggest strength here, his business record, obviously his strength on the economy. this is what she said about donald trump outsourcing jobs to other countries. >> trump's own products are made in a lot of countries that aren't named america. trump ties are made in china. trump suits in mexico. trump furniture in turkey. trump picture frames in india. trump barware in slovenia, and i could go on and on, but you get the idea. >> trump responded to all that just a few hours later. >> you know why? because they devalue their currencies and they make it impossible for companies to compete. and she doesn't have to say that because i say it all the time. i say unfortunately my ties are made in china. and i will say this.
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the hats, make america great again, i searched long and hard to find somebody that made the hats in this country. >> okay. john, to you, this is a time when the democrats and hillary clinton are really trying to define donald trump. they think they can do it now. they'll pretty much have a lock on this, and it looks like it could be working, at least for now. >> well, it worked in 2012 against mitt romney, and they're hoping it will work again now. and it's not been a good two weeks for donald trump. but what's interesting is a lot of these same attacks we heard in the republican primary, and they didn't stick. >> different audience. >> the different audience but also trump was in control of the narrative. trump was defining his opponents early. trump has to reversz it. we're going to see a big speech from him tomorrow, and for his sake, he needs to be able to take control of the narrative but also take control of the narrative in the ad wars. right now, he's not raising enough money to do that. so if he doesn't do both of those, he's in deep trouble. >> dave, do you think clinton needs more momentum. most polls show she's ahead of
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trump right now. but she's got a huge machine behind her in terms of cash and the number of staff members. and yet, you know, there's just about, what, a seven-point average lead that she has on trump. >> she's got the wind at her back, and i thunk a lot of that stems from the sort of coalition building that she did with barack obama, elizabeth warren, joe iden. a lot of bernie sanders are starting to shift and coalesce behind her. she's really unified the democratic party and i see that's why we saw the bump in polling. bloomberg came out with a poll that shows her 12 points ahead, but i think the average is about seven. i think in terms of the jobs and the economy issue, she's got a third party validator now that's helping to build a case against donald trump. moody's analytics said that donald trump would pose a serious danger to the global economy. that coupled with her speech today i think is going to be a strategy where she tries to put a wedge between donald trump and the voters in terms of the economy and skbrobs. >> i think it's a hard argument for hillary clinton to make because the reverse question is,
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okay, if he's bad on the economy, then are you good? well, donald trump can make the argument saying you can argue about my record, but i've created jobs and you haven't. i think it's a hard argument for her to make at the end of the day. >> with that this mind, she continues to try and tie donald trump, the businessman, to what a donald trump president would be like. listen to this. >> he bankrupted his companies not once, not twice, but four times. hundreds of people lost their jobs. shareholders were wiped out. contractors, many of them small businesses, took heavy losses. many went bust. but donald trump, he came out fine. here's what he said about one of those bankruptcies. i figured it was the bank's problem, not mine. >> and, john, to your point, i think this goes to what you're saying. donald trump can say i did build that casino. i did build that hotel, but the
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democrats are going to say, you did it off the backs of the hill guy. you paid 30 cents on the dollar. >> that's a standard democratic attack that the republicans and donald trump in this case is the evil corporate raider. i don't think it's going to stick because hillary clinton has the difficult challenge of redefining people's perceptions about donald trump that he is a successful businessman. people think that to his core. and donald trump was successful in the republican primary, especially with blue collar, middle class, white workers because he's not just a billionaire. he's a blue collar billionaire. >> but, you know, looking to the general, he's got a cash problem, right? >> he does. >> how is he going to get major gop donors to start backing him, especially -- will they be watching his response closely tomorrow? >> that's right. they're going to -- if they don't see polling numbers starting to shift in the next two weeks, i think it starts to pick up a momentum of itself. donald trump failed to plan in the primary for the general election and create that donor machine that he needs now. and, look, that may be the
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thing. if he doesn't pull it out, it will be because he didn't prepare for a general election to fight in the ad wars that he needs. >> and, david, we're all wondering why isn't he buying ads? it's because he's got no money. >> and he doesn't put his money where his mouth is. he said that he was going to put a billion dollars into this campaign in the primary. >> he said he could fund it for around $70 million. can you run a presidential campaign on $70 million? >> not a chance. >> the governor's race, -- >> while he's trying to raise money, he needs to look at this as an opportunity and says, yes, she's raised a lot of money and she's raised it from special interests like wall street and drive that wedge while he's trying to put together his own war chest. >> that's appealing to his base. they like the optics that he's not beholden to major lobbyists. >> it's not just his base. a lot of america was attracted to bernie sanders for that very same reason. so he can expand the tent by driving that message.
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>> and hillary clinton did talk about wall street reform, and she warned that donald trump would undo what barack obama has done. listen to this. >> trump would take us back to where we were before the crisis. he'd rig the economy for wall street again. well, that will not happen on my watch. i can guarantee you. >> and, dave, when i heard that, you know what i thought? release the transcripts. release the transcripts of your speeches to wall street. why not? >> bringing up the wall street issue for sure is going to be a double-edged sword for her on that front. but i do think there is some credence to the issue of donald trump's tax plan, right? i mean the reality is he says he's for working class and poor americans. but if you look at his comprehensive tax plan that he rolled out during the primary, it's a billionaire tax plan for billionaires and millionaires. it's basically george bush trickle down economics that does nothing for poor and working class families. hillary clinton's plan, she's
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going to be investing billions of dollars in infrastructure and ed education and thinks that create jobs and help middle class families make ends meet. >> i think it's a slippery slope. most voters think she is beholden to wall street. she had a lot of problem with that in her own primary. if i'm giving advice to hillary clinton, i would say stick to things that are easy. call him dangerous on foreign policy. call him reckless, whatever you want. don't attack him on wall street. >> what do you think we're going to hear tomorrow when trump responds to this? you think he's going to bring in the wall street issues and also -- i mean here's some of the points of the planned speech that we're hearing here at cnn. you know, obviously touching on the clinton e-mail scandal that she's been embroiled in, the trade deficit, her immigrations policies. and the clinton foundation. and of course, you know, his insults of her, tying her to being crooked hillary. give us a kind of a preview. >> i think you're going to see he's going to throw the kitchen sink at her tomorrow and we're going to see this ramp up in negativity. he's going to undermine her on her issues of foreign policy. look at her record of libya and
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benghazi and what happened there. i think he's also going to undermine her as to her record with women and defending or actually tearing down women in essence to defend her husband. i think also he's going to tie points between the clinton foundation and her time as secretary of state and foreign governments giving donations to the clinton foundation. there's a lot of material there. i don't think he can get it all done in one speech. >> dave? >> i think the question is like does he break any new news? is he putting out any information that hasn't really been, you know, dug into throughout the primary process? like is he coming up with anything new that hasn't been discussed? if he's just circulating warmed over talking points, i don't think it's going to go over well and i think we're going to shift back to the momentum question of his tanking poll numbers, the fact he's got lackluster fund-raising. >> let's remember the millennials of our generation didn't see the lewinsky scandals. most aren't familiar with what hillary did or did not do.
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>> guys, thanks very much. >> good to have you both. thanks for coming in. some background now on another party which we rarely hear about. they're called the libertarians. >> who? they say they are the third largest and fast ef growing political party in the u.s. a group of activists founded the party in 1971. libertarians propose substantial cuts to the size of government and taxes and say they will give people more personal freedom and responsibility. >> former new mexico governor gary johnson is the party's presidential nominee with former massachusetts governor william weld up for vice president. some recent polls indicate the libertarians have the support of up to 12% of voters. >> and the two nominees will appear on our network. chris cuomo is moderating the cnn libertarian party town hall. >> join us on wednesday for this live event, 9:00 p.m. eastern for our viewers in the u.s., and again on thursday morning, 10:00 a.m. in london for our international viewers. only on cnn. time to take a short break.
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when we return, voters in england's eastern coastal towns are still undecided on the brexit. their reasons for and against it, next. ♪ (ee-e-e-oh-mum-oh-weh) (hush my darling...) (don't fear my darling...) (the lion sleeps tonight.) (hush my darling...) man snoring (don't fear my darling...)
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glad to have you back. wednesday is the final day of campaigning before the uk brexit referendum, and both sides are fighting to sway the undecided voters. >> advocates for the leave and remain camps made passionate appeals during a televised debate before 6,000 people in london tuesday night. >> turkey is not set to join the eu.
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turkey is not set to join the eu. boris, boris, you're telling lies, and you're scaring people because you have used taxpayers' money to put out an election leaflet that says turkey is set to join. and there's a map. this map shows in red turkey, but the only countries named in this map are syria and iraq. that's scare mongering, boris. >> we heard earlier that the prime minister was meant to have got a deal. that deal amounted to absolutely nothing. it's temporary. so when you have had the most serious renegotiation attempts by a british prime minister, certainly since i've been in politics, and the best he got out was nothing, how do you think you're going to change it after you vote to remain? vote leave. >> the husband of slain parliament member who supported the remain camp is speaking out
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about her political views. jo cox was fatally shot and stabbed last week in northern england. >> wednesday would have been her 42nd birthday. her husband, brendan, says she would want him to fight for her legacy. >> she was a politician, and she had very strong political views. and i believe she was killed because of those views. i think she died because of them. and she would want to stand up for those in death as much as she did in life. i don't want people ascribing views to her that she didn't have, but i certainly want to continue to fight for the legacy and for the politics and the views that she espoused because they were what she was. she died for them, and we definitely want to make sure
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that we continue to fight for them. >> well, the brexit divide extends across the uk. in smaller communities, some ceu membership is a major boost for their local economies. >> others say regulations have wiped out their businesses. >> reporter: as britain races towards its eu referendum, kevin anderson hopes his country stays the european course. kevin owns a kite surfing and water sport school on the northeast coast and said the eu has been good for business. >> i rely on people to have the cash to come and spend with me to learn and enjoy the activities that we do. and i believe that if we do leave, it will affect the economy, and people will have less money in their pockets. >> reporter: the turbulent run-up to the june 23rd vote has dragged the leave and the remain campaigns into a divisive war of words, and this region, like so many others, remains undecided. many residents praise the european union for enforcing common environmental standards,
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important in an area with vast nature reserves and bathing spots. eu regulations, for instance, on water quality have done a lot to clean up england's beaches, the folks here tell us. they say that's helped to boost the tourism sector. of course there are older, more traditional industries in this region that have suffered, and many here hold the eu accountable. most of the trollers lay idle, and the once proud fishing town. only one vessel still regularly heads out to sea. the fish auction, like the day's catch, a sad sight. darryn butcher has seen scarborough's fleet and with it, this town, decline for years. >> it was a big market 20 years ago, a huge market full of fish. two or three times a week at least. it's gone from that to, you know, very few. so they've put a wall in. they don't need the space now. >> reporter: most fishermen
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blame eu quotas for their woes and many say they'll vote out this thursday. kevin anderson on the other hand says his cast his ballot to remain, fearing the uncertainty of a brexit could cause britain's economy to go out of control and possibly crash. fred pleitgen, cnn, england. >> if you'd like to learn more about the uk referendum, head over to our website, cnn.com. that is where you can read about the leave and remain camps and their respective arguments. out rage after one boss decided to spank his workers all in the name of team-building. that is cyber-crime. and it affects each and every one of us. microsoft created the digital crimes unit to fight cyber-crime. we use the microsoft cloud to visualize information so we can track down the criminals. when it comes to the cloud,
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>> reporter: the bank supervisory board says it's removed two executives from their posts. linda kincaid, cnn. >> here's a tip. don't work at that bank. seriously. oh, my god. >> banking sounds more like beating, right? you're watching "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. i'm amara walker. >> i'm john vause. the news continues with rosemary church after a short break. show me movies with romance.
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call or go online and switch to x1. only with xfinity. final pictures. advocates for and against staying in the eu clash in a heated debate before thursday's vote. unforgivable. tokyo heaps criticism on north korea after it launches a pair of banned missiles within hours of each other. and california burning. fast-moving fires force hundreds to evacuate their homes near los angeles. hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and, of course, all around the world. thanks for your company. i'm rosemary church, and this is "cnn newsroom."
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and we are now in the final hours of campaigning on the question of whether the uk should stay in the european union. the issue has divided the country with polls suggesting thursday's vote is too close to call. a record 46.5 million people have registered to vote. both sides are trying to suede any -- sway any undecided voters. 6,000 people attended the firely debate wednesday night at london's wembley arena. former mayor boris johnson insisted the eu is bad for british business. >> the remain side cannot think of a single one of the eu's multitude of regulations that they would get rid of, not even the clinical trials directive. the eu, the eu is, i'm afraid, a job-destroying engine. you can see it all across southern europe, and you can see
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it on -- you can see it in this country as well. >> and on the remain side, johnson's successor, london mayor sadiq kahn says the experts agree britain is better off in europe, and he challenged leave supporters to stay and fight for fair treatment from the eu. >> in fact, all of them are saying we're safer together. >> all of them are also saying that as long as the european union keeps trying to copy what nature does, if the countries across europe are not paying their 2% of the gdp, which is the nature company, we will be weakening it. >> stay and fight. don't quit. why are you a quitter? we're better than that. we can do it. >> and our phil black joins us now from london with what's expected to be a long day of campaigning. so, fill, it is the last day of campaigning, and brits heard final pitches at wembley arena
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during that fiery debate. how likely is it that undecided voters were swayed by what was said, and what's expected to come out of campaigning the day before this vote? >> reporter: well, rosemary, the performances on both sides, you'd have to say, were pretty song. but i think if you're an undecided voter in britain today, that's still a very awkward position to occupy. because what became clear through that debate that even now, on the very eve of this huge political decision, that both sides are still disputing some very basic facts here, like how much money does britain actually contribute to the european union? how many laws come from brussels and are enforced upon the british people? and that's before you even begin to consider far less predictable, you would think, less factual issues like what will the impact of brexit be on the british economy? there is obviously enormous difference there as well.
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the remain camp believes that it's got the economic argument sewn up. the support of a distinct majority of experts, individuals, organizations who all sale there will be a huge economic hit. the brexit camp says, well, there's a conspiracy among interested individual who's have a vested interest in the staus quo, or they simply dismiss the experts as people who have got it wrong beforeme. all of that is still undecided at this very late stage in the discussion. so today we will see more people on both sides continuing to press their case. we're not going to hear anything new, though. this has been going on for months. the arguments, the themes, are very well established. but the other point to consider here -- and it is important. and again we saw this in the debate last night. people will not just be voting on factual issues. they will -- or the economy or these sorts of things. there is an emotive element to
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this as well, and it does appear that the brexit side, those encouraging britain to leave the european union, are able to tap into a feeling -- call it patriotism, nationalism, kwha whatever you like. but although the crowd was rowdy across the board, it was by far the roud iest in response to arguments by the brexit debaters encouraging britain to go it alone, to back their own country, to show independence, and to show that sort of positivity. so there's a lot to consider, and undecided voters, as i say, have a lot to think about in these final 24 hours. >> and, phil, most assessments suggest it's way too close to call. so how many brits remain undecided at this stage, and how soon will the results be revealed once this vote takes place? >> reporter: difficult to put a precise number on the undecideds. but what the polls have shown throughout is that the portion of the undecided vote is big
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enough to decide the ultimate result. now, it's a truism of many tight political contests that the undecided voters will determine the outcome. but it does seem to be absolutely true in this case that those wavering few will determine the economic, the geopolitical direction of this country for decades to come. the polling, the voting itself, will close late tomorrow night. the voting -- the counting starts straightaway, will continue through the night. all that means is we should know come friday morning whether or not britain will remain within the european union. >> indeed we shall. our phil black joining us live from london just after 8:00 in the morning there. many thanks to you, phil. well, europe is looking on nervously as the brexit vote fast approaches. cnn's will ripley went to the streets of paris to see how britain's neighbors feel. >> reporter: summer in the city of light means outdoor cafes, selfies on the seine. strolls along the shaumpz ali
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say. most pa re shens are not preoccupied with the looming brexit vote, but some are nervous. >> i am a little bit worried about it, yes. i think it will be a pity if this cohesion would disappear. >> i would like them to stay. >> why? >> because even if it's difficult, i think we build something very nice. >> reporter: at newspaper kiosks, headlines portray europe and britain as a marriage on the rocks. but at least on the continent, few seem ready to divorce. some of the french press think it's incredible britain would even consider leaving the eu. this is one of the more colorful headlines and illustrations here. it reads, the glifrn, they're mad. and the french economy minister told the newspaper le monde, that britain would quickly become a small, isolated island. while the prime minister says britain leaving the eu would be a terrible shock. this statue of winston churchill pays tribute to his war time
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leadership and vision of a european family, but a family feud is deening. >> you don't want to see the disintegration of europe and what it can lead to. >> reporter: french auth thore and commentator says british voters have a huge responsibility. >> a responsibility that goes much beyond great britain, much beyond europe. it is the west at large that is at stake. >> reporter: this increasingly fractured europe is reflected in the views of football fans here for euro 2016. these men from northern ireland say they want the uk to leave. >> britain would be bullied by europe. should we remain? like an adulterous husband has taken back to the wife? >> northern ireland and brita britain -- >> reporter: german fans say they're rooting for britain to remain. >> they have to take into account that the economic power
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will decrease. unemployment will increase. >> they'll stay because it will be a disaster for europe if they will be out. >> reporter: by the end of the this week, british football teams may still be in europe, but their country could be on the way out. will ripley, cnn, paris. and the global markets have kept a close eye on the brexit debate. we will check on the just opened european markets in a few minutes. and they can't vote yet, but some schoolchildren's grasp of brexit may surprise you. that is later in the program. north korea launched two intermediate range missiles from its eastern coast into the sea of japan. south korea says the first one failed after flying 150 kilometers wednesday morning. the second missile is still being investigated. north korea has tried to test this type of missile four other
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times since april. cnn's paula hancocks in seoul, south korea. she joins us now live. so, paula, it is highly unusual, isn't it, to sea north korea test two missiles just within hours of each other? what is being said about that, and what more are we learning about what was achieved by these missile tests? >> reporter: well, rosemary, i think the second missile launch is what most people are looking at at this point. south korean defense ministry officials saying that it flew around 400 kilometers, 250 miles. and certainly that's further than we appear to have seen from these musudan missiles in the past. thee are intermediate range missiles. at the lower range, they could hit south korea, they could hit japan. at the higher range, they could potentially hit u.s. military bases on guam. so certainly 400 kilometers is not the full range, but it is
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considered progress by many people. we're hearing from japan's military as well, and one official saying that they are concerned by these launches. so certainly the fact that many people are saying even with failures, north korea is learning something does appear to be the case. that there does seem to be more progress in these musudan missiles. and of course these are mobile missiles, which makes them even more of a concern to those in the neighborhood. rosemary. >> yeah, that's certainly a worry. what has been the overall global reaction to this, and how far away do authorities believe north korea might be from its ultimate goal of establishing a delivery system for a nuclear weapon? >> reporter: well, it's a very difficult question to answer exactly how far it might be. but certainly the pace at which north korea is testing these missiles at this point is far quicker than we have seen in the past. when you look at the predecessor, the late kim
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jong-il, the south korean defense minister told me that in 18 years of his reign, he had 18 missile tests. but when it comes to kim jong-un, in just four years, he's about 27 missile tests. so you can see the pace is increasing with this new north korean leader. and certainly we've seen condemnation from japan's prime minister. we've seen it from the south korean side. washington was very quick with its condemnation. the state department spokesman saying that they condemn this and all of the missile tests because they're against the u.n. security council resolutions. but also pointing out that they believe that this will rally the troops behind these sanctions that have been passed in recent months against north korea. that this just strengthens the international community's resolve to make sure show sanctions have an impact. rosemary. >> all right. our paula hancocks staying on top of this developing story from seoul in south korea just after 4:00 there. many thanks.
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turning to the race for the white house now, and a new cnn/orc poll shows hillary clinton leads donald trump for president, but just slightly. 47% of registered voters surveyed said clinton was their choice for president. 42% say trump is their man. meanwhile, the republican is in the middle of a cash crunch. on tuesday, trump said he's willing to spend his own money to fund his general election campaign if he has to. jim acosta has more. >> reporter: despite a lifetime of cutting deals that made him billions of dollars, donald trump is so short of campaign cash, gop jaws are dropping. but don't worry, says trump. >> this weekend we had a very big fund-raising weekend. it's not revealed yet, but we raised a lot of money. ♪ >> reporter: still consider the numbers. according to federal campaign filings, hillary clinton finished the month of may with
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$42 million in the bank. trump ended up with a tiny fraction of that haul, just $1.3 million. other glaring findings this month. 17% of the campaign spending was dished out to trump-related entities, like when the campaign rents space from a trump property for an event. and $35,000 went to something called draper sterling. >> it's exactly what they wanted. >> reporter: an expenditure with a name reminiscent of the advertising agency in the hit show "mad men." trump released a statement on his fund-raising, noting his appeals to donors are just beginning. adding, if need be, there could be unlimited cash on hand as i would put up my own money. earlier in the day he blamed republicans who haven't rallied behind his campaign. >> they don't want to come on. they will probably eventually come on. honestly if they don't, it's just fine. i can win it either way. >> reporter: nothing to see here out of the rnc. >> i appreciate everyone's concern over the state of our party. we're doing just great. >> reporter: trump is signaling more aggressive stage of the campaign is just ahead.
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his campaign is blasting out e-mails and hitting social media to counter clinton's latest attacks, responding faster than it has before. >> she's been there watching. >> reporter: trump advisers are hopeful it's a change for the better after the firing of campaign manager corey lewandowski. the candidate was also out shoring up support among evangelical leaders in new york. >> contribute, i owe so much to it in so many ways, through life, through having incredible children, through so many other things. i also owe it for frankly standing here, because the jeej vote was mostly gotten by me. >> reporter: and donald trump has a speech set for tomorrow aimed at hillary clinton right here in new york city. has campaign has also set up a website called lying crooked hillary.com, but the campaign acknowledges it's not ready and won't be up and running for a few days. jim acosta, cnn, new york. up next, new details on the orlando terror attack.
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what the gunman did in the hours before the shooting, and why it's raising questions about his bigger plan. and scorch. record winds, heat, and drought fuel dangerous fires in southern california. what's next for the area? that's after the break. the fastest food truck min brooklyn. meet mylanta® tonight. it's also fast, but unlike godawgs, it makes heartburn after dinner, history. new mylanta® tonight. faster than heartburn. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare,
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investigators say orlando gunman omar mateen was inside the pulse nightclub several hours before the terror attack. they think he could have been checking the club's security. ed lavandera has the latest. >> reporter: omar mateen was angry as he packed a bag with his guns and then made the two-hour drive from his home to the pulse nightclub in orlando. that's what law enforcement sources say noor salman, mateen's wife, has told investigators. salman says she pleaded with mateen not to leave and grabbed him by the arm. she says she didn't know he was planning to kill dozens of people at the club. she also never called police to report what was happening. law enforcement sources also say the day before the attack, mateen purchased three plane tickets for himself, his wife,
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and child to fly to california. on tuesday, attorney general loretta lynch visited the shooting site but refused to say if criminal charges will be brought against salman. are you convinced that omar mateen's wife did not know about this attack, or should she have done more to stop it? >> well, we're not going to speak about anyone else's role in this right now while we're investigating the matter. we are trying to learn everything we can about mateen and all the people in his ambit in the days and weeks and months leading up to this attack. >> reporter: investigators are using mateen's cell phone and surveillance video inside the club to build a timeline of his movements in the hours before the deadly rampage. law enforcement sources tell cnn mateen showed up at the pulse nightclub earlier in the evening, paid the entry fee, and obtained a wrist band. he may have been checking the building's security that night. mateen left the club, came back two hours later, and unleashes the violent shooting spree.
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investigators are trying to figure out what mateen was doing during those two hours. >> that's why we're asking for anybody and everybody that's had any contact with this individual to come forward so we can piece that information together. >> reporter: attorney general lynch says investigators are still working to determine whether mateen acted oat solely as a self-radicalized extremist or if he was driven by homophobia. >> we do feel as we continue to build a timeline and a chronology and to build his life, that we will be able to determine this. i cannot tell you definitively that we will ever narrow it down to one motivation. >> reporter: investigators have finished collecting evidence at the pulse nightclub. the roads have opened up, and a small memorial of flowers and tributes is already being left under the club's marquis. ed lavandera, cnn, orlando, florida. an american teenager is under arrest for attempting to provide material support to isis and travel overseas to join the terror organization. fbi agents took akram musleh
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into custody in indiana. they say he was trying to board a bus to new york, where he had a scheduled flight to morocco and then was heading to isis-controlled territory. if convicted, the 18-year-old faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison and a 250,0$250 fine. let's check some other news now. at least 25 people were killed when an arsenal of weapons and ammunition blew up in a town on libya's mediterranean coast. a health official says residents were fighting a rebel group for control of the stockpile when it exploded. a women's group in india is demanding an apology from one of the bollywood's biggest stars. they're upset salman kahn said he felt like a raped woman during a film shoot. he made that remark while talking about how difficult it was to film physically demanding scenes for his upcoming movie. his father later tweeted that
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kahn did not intend to offend anyone. torrential rains have triggered flooding in eastern china, affecting more than 7 million people. 35 residents have been killed and another 24 are listed as missing. the damage is estimated at $96 million. well, let's turn now to the world of sport, and police used tear gas to break up scuffling euro 2016 fans before poland's game against ukraine in marseille, france, on tuesday. police say they arrested six people. poland won the match 1-0. and at the cope pa america semifinals, at least one fan in houston got what he came for before the start the start of the second half. he ran onto the pitch and hugged lionel messi. messi was a nice guy about it. he signed the fan's jersey before security escorted the intruder out.
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the international olympic committee says it is focused on keeping the rio games free from doping. the group met in switzerland tuesday, where it announced its latest plan. world sports don riddell breaks it all down. >> reporter: just 45 days now until the start of the olympics, and it is far from clear who exactly is going to be competing. we already knew that russian track and field athletes had been excluded, and following an ioc meeting on tuesday, that is broadly still the case. but it's quite possible that even more athletes could find themselves uninvited. so broken is russia's anti-doping program that olympic organizers are now seriously worried about other athletes from russia and, for that matter, kenya, whose own program has been declared noncompliant. it means every athlete from those countries has now had their olympic plans thrown into chaos. >> each athlete coming from these two countries will have to
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declare eligible by the respective international federation following an individual procedure and an individual evaluation of the situation. >> reporter: so we're now talking about some 500 athletes who are back under the microscope, and the governing bodies of 28 different sports have been charged with the responsibility of determining who is clean and who is not as the ioc president thomas bach just said, they will be evaluated individually. this is a special measure because the ioc has such little faith in the testing programs in russia and kenya. and i repeat, there is barely a month left to get this all sorted out. in addition, the ioc has supported the iaaf stance on the track and field ban for russia, but says that any of those athletes who can prove that they are clean through the court of arbitration for sport will be allowed to compete in rio.
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they say they'll be allowed to compete under the russian flag, which is contrary to the iaaf's position last week. there was also talk that a furious russia would consider a total boycott of the games in rio. but the russian news agency is quoting russia's olympic chief as saying this won't happen. however, they may consider legal action. the official response from the russian ministry of sport is this. they say, quote, we have long stated that individual athletes in russia are willing to demonstrate their innocence and prove they are clean. our olympians are ready to go over and above all the normal anti-doping tests to show their commitment to clean and fair sport. >> don riddell reporting there. we'll take a very short break here. still to come, hillary clinton says donald trump's business experience will bankrupt the u.s. if he's president. their latest war of words including new battling websites when we come back. plus as europe waits anxiously for the coming brexit
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vote, global markets are also getting the jitters. that story still to come. stay with us.
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hey guys lunch is here! it's on me fellas.
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with the chase mobile app, stephen curry can send money to more people in less time. thanks, steph! no problem. even to friends in a growing number of other banks. ya'll ready to go? come on fellas let's go! easy to use chase technology for whatever you're trying to master. and a warm welcome back to you all. you're watching "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. time of course to update you on the stories we've been following this hour. north korea launched two intermediate range missiles from its eastern coast into the sea of japan. south korea says the first one failed after flying 150 kilometers on wednesday. the second missile fired about two hours later. that's still being analyzed. donald trump says he may use some of his own money to fund
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his presidential campaign. right now his political war chest has just over $1 million compared to hillary clinton's $42 million. trump has only just started courting big republican donors. the final day of campaigning on the uk's referendum on membership in the european union is under way. polls suggest the outcome of thursday's brexit vote is too close to call. a record 46.5 million people have registered to vote on the question. well, the chairwoman of the u.s. federal reserve is warning against a brexit. janet yellen told u.s. lawmakers tuesday the vote could have significant economic repercussions for global financial markets. >> i think it would usher in a period of uncertainty, and it is very hard to predict. but there could be a period of financial market volatility that would negatively affect
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financial conditions and the u.s. economic outlook that's by no means certain. but it is something that we will be carefully monitoring. >> janet yellen is just one of many voices warning of significant consequences following a leave vote. cnn money europe editor nina dos santos joins me now from london with more. nina, this is it. i mean we've seen with this particular issue that britain very divided and, of course, concerns right across the globe. we're seeing impacts on markets throughout. talk to us about the reaction to the markets that opened today. >> reporter: well, let's go straight to the markets that are open where i am at the moment, rosemary. as you can see from the chart i'm about to show you, the ftse 100 is basically standing in flat territory at the moment. just down around about 2 hundredths of 1%. the rest of the european markets not doing quite so badly. these gains and losses not
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particularly pronounced on either side. a lot of nervousness. people deciding perhaps to stay on the sidelines because nobody really knows what will happen by the end of the week. just going back to the kind of comments that people like janet yellen have been making, that's not the first time that she's made the comment that there could be quite some significant uncertainty coming from this vote. in fact, it's the second time in just a month that she's said that. last time she made those comments is when the federal reserve decided to stand pat on interest rates. remember the fed is already in that cycle of raising interest rates. the only major world economy to do so at the moment. and she said there was too much uncertainty these days to consider another rate hike for the month of june. and mario dragi, the head of the ecb just yesterday also was another one of those key central bankers saying we stand ready to act if there are any problems that come from a potential brexit. if there is any risks to european assets, the cor the eurozone is a big trading partner for the uk.
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just like janet yellen, both of these two characters just said we just don't know where this is going to go. >> thanks so much for that. nina dose santos joining us live from london. many thanks to you. wednesday is the last day for leave and remain supporters to sway undecided referendum voters. let's bring in claire' for more details. she is the chief innovation officer for the market research company. thank you so much for being with us. now, of course, as we've said, most indications are as a result of polls that this is too close to call. but what's your research telling you, and what impact might turnout have on the outcome here? >> well, i mean i think what's interesting is if we look back over the last decade, the eu is not seen as something that most brits really cared about. between 2005 and 2015, only 5% of people were telling us that this was an issue that was important in facing britain.
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we've sort of been whipped up into this sort of hysteria over the last few weeks and months, and it's now an increasingly difficult thing for us as pollsters to call. last week we found that leave was slightly ahead. but polls are suggesting that there's been a sort of a bit of a shift back towards remain this week. when we asked people last week what they thought would actually happen as opposed to how they were going to vote, more people -- 55% -- says they thought we would remain in the e eu. that's down from 75% in february. >> it's interesting. many people wondering what impact the tragic murder of british mp jo cox may have had on this change of tone and what seems to be this move only slightly perhaps towards the remain vote. i want to talk to you about that aspect and also the undecided voters because they are critical in this.
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this could change it either way, right? >> yeah. it's very difficult to sort of pick -- sort of unpick what's happening. so there's no doubt that the public don't like adversarial politics. they've been calling out for a long time for more considered opinions, for more facts on the eu. and i think the unveiling of the immigration poster may have had an impact. the reaction to that. clearly the tragic death of jo cox. but also as we get closer to the poll itself, we tend to see more people starting to think a little bit more about how they're going to vote. we saw a similar trend in the scottish independence referendum whereas we got closer to the vote, we thought the independence was sort of shifting ahead. but actually when people got to the ballot box, as things got closer, the status quo starts to look a little bit more attractive to people. sometimes we get a little bit more risk averse.
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so it's hard to say which of these things is actually causing this potential shift. but of course until tomorrow, we don't know for sure. >> indeed. we shall have to wait until thursday. claire emes thanks for sharing your research and sentiment with us. to learn more about the us referendum, head over to our website, cnn.com. that's where you can read about the leave and remain camps and their respective arguments. still to come, hillary clinton says donald trump will be disastrous for the u.s. economy. we will ask an expert if she has her facts right.
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all right. let's return to the race for the white house now. presumptive democratic nominee hillary clinton is tearing into donald trump's business
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failures, calling him a danger to the economy. in a new report from moody's analytics predicts the u.s. would lose 3.5 million jobs if trump becomes president. jeff zeleny has more. >> we can't let him bankrupt america like we are one of his failed casinos. >> reporter: hillary clinton delivering a blistering takedown of donald trump's business record. >> just like he shouldn't have his finger on the button, he shouldn't have his hands on our economy. >> reporter: it's her latest effort to brand trump as a dangerous menace. this time on the economy. she spoke from the floor of an auto plant in ohio, a critical battleground where she hopes to limit trump's appeal to working-class voters. >> every day we see how reckless and careless trump is. he's proud of it. well, that's his choice except
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when he's asking to be our president. then it's our choice. >> reporter: trump offering his real-time response on twitter, refuting one point after another. how can hillary run the economy when she can't even send e-mails without putting entire nation at risk, he wrote. as she tries defining him, the clinton machine is overwhelming him, at least in traditional metrics. first in fund-raising. a staggering $42 million to $1.3 million in the bank. and in organization as seen by today's three-point attack. her speech -- >> he's written a lot of books about business. they all seem to end at chapter 11. >> reporter: paired with a web video. >> have you ever heard of trump steaks? >> you know what? take a look at trump steaks. >> whatever happened to trump airlines? >> reporter: and a website called the art of the steal. >> the united states of america doesn't do business trump's way. >> reporter: she's hoping this coordinated campaign will turn around numbers like this.
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trump leads by eight points on the economy, a new cnn/orc poll finds. cnn has learned clinton is narrowing her choices for a running mate, privately studying the records of a handful of prospects including elizabeth warren, tim cane, and hul yen castro. her list is not limbed to these three is a search that's highly secretive and intensifying. tru >> trump ties are made in china. trump suits in mexico. trump furniture in turkey. trump picture frames in india. trump barware in slovenia. i could go on and on, but you get the idea. and i'd love for him to explain how all that fits with his talk about america first. >> reporter: now, clinton delivered a point by point takedown of trump's economic policies, but politics matters here as well. that's why she went hard after the fact that he did not use american workers as he made at least part of his fortune.
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that's key here no ohio, where these 18 electoral votes will be critical in the general election matchup between trump and hillary clinton. jeff zeleny, cnn, columbus, ohio. senator elizabeth warren is also piling on donald trump. in a new political ad, she attacks trump for refusing to release his tax returns. take a look. >> maybe he's just a lousy businessman who doesn't want you to find out he's worth a whole lot less money than he claims. we just really can't know for sure. here's what we do know. the last time donald trump's taxes were made public, it turned out that donald trump paid nothing in federal taxes. zero. >> all right. let's get more now from ron fa rue ha, cnn global economic an liftd and author of the book "makers and takers." thanks so much for being with us. >> thanks for having me. >> of course i do want to get to trump's tax issue in just a moment. but first hillary clinton bashed
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donald trump's business record tuesday and said he would be a disaster for the u.s. economy. but you say she didn't go far enough. what do you mean by that? >> well, you know, i think that she did one thing of the two things she needs to do to really prove she's the right person for the economic part of the presidency. she's made it clear just how bad donald trump's policies are, and many of them really are very worrisome. there's a new report out showing that if all of his proposals so far to cut taxes, many of the taxes that he would cut are on the rich -- would go through, then we would have slower growth. we would lose as many as 3.4 million jobs because he doesn't have adequate spending cuts to compensate for this. so basically what you end up is a lot more debt spending, a growing deficit, which is essentially reagan onlyics on steroids. so a very bad growth plan. there's also the inflammatory trade rhetoric and so on. but what hillary clinton needs to do now is tell us not just why donald trump's ideas are bad, but why hers are good.
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and that's hopefully what she's going to roll out in the next few days and weeks are more inspiring proposals about what the 21st century labor market is going to look like, how she's going to help protect americans in the gig economy, how she's going to get people retained for the kind of work that we need them to do in the coming decades in and the century ahead. that's what americans i think really want to hear. the one thing i have to criticize about the speech was that it just didn't have that note of inspiration, and that's really what she needs going forward, i think. >> all right. and while clinton was speaking, trump was tweeting, accusing clinton -- >> always. >> -- of defrauding america when she was secretary of state, saying she used her position to get rich and was corrupt, dangerous, and dishonest. what's your reaction to his comments there? >> i think that that's the usual sort of inflammatory stuff that we see. you know, donald trump has always a barrage of tweets when hillary is speaking. many of them are nonsensical. i mean the bottom line here is
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that most of what she said in her -- if not all of what she said in her speech was entirely factual. it's clear that a lot of his proposals are met with a lot of skepticism by most mainstream economists. the question now is what is hillary clinton going to do to really turn the american economy, the recovery that we've had, which is the slowest, longest one in the post-war world war ii era into something more robust? i think that's what people want to hear now. >> let's quickly go back to trump's tax returns. should we be seeing them by now as elizabeth warren suggests? >> i think so. it's complete a typical in the u.s. presidentle campaign for the candidate not to release tax returns. i think she's on to something when she posits these two ideas. maybe he's not paying that much in taxes. look at what happened in 2012 when romney was pushed. it came out that in fact his tax returns were -- sorry -- his tax rate was much lower than what many americans that make very little money are paying.
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so i think that whatever it is, it's probably embarrassing. that's probably why he hasn't released it yet. but, again, it's very atypical, and i think it's going to hurt him in this next round of the race. >> and before we go, i do want to ask you this. you have said that clinton could benefit from britain's vote on leaving the eu thursday. what did you mean by that? >> well, i certainly don't want to see the kind of market chaos that i think could result in the short term from a leave vote. but i also think that in a situation like that, it's possible that someone like hillary clinton will be perceived as being a more safe pair of hands, sort of a steady, establishment leader, you know, that could buffer the sort of market reaction that you might see if there is a leave vote. it's not something i'm hoping for, but it's possible. >> all right. always a pleasure to talk with you. thanks so much. >> and you. crews in southern california are dealing with another raging
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wildfire. this one popped up in the san gabriel canyon and has already consumed about 1,500 acres. clouds of smoke could be seen from nearby dodger stadium. crews have the sherpa fire 62% contained, but l.a. county fire officials say the fish fire is still growing. well, prepare to get schooled on the brexit vote. when we return, these kids will explain some of the issues at the heart of the referendum. back in a moment.
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a federal judge in california says a lawsuit against starbucks may continue. two customers claim the coffee giant underfills its popular drinks by about 25%. starbucks says any reasonable customer would not be misled, and that the suit is without merit. another lawsuit filed this year claims starbucks puts too much ice in its drinks so customers get less liquid. well, the upcoming brexit vote has passionate supporters in the leave and remain camps. but what does some of the uk's youngest citizens think about
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the referendum? cnn asked them. >> do you know what brexit is? >> i'm not really sure. >> oh, it's like british exit. >> i think that people are going to have a vote to see whether we're going to go out of the eu or not. >> mm-hmm. >> why do you think britain might want to leave of thethe e? >> migration. >> we should let people come in because britain would be more multi cultural. >> we want to be an independent country. >> people could argue that, you know, we have our own parliament, we have our own government, and that's been set up to decide our own laws. >> how do you think a brexit would affect you? >> it might affect my -- affect my holiday. >> because now you could just book a ticket, and you could start packing. >> you'd need to get a visa and everything. >> i think the main reason it will affect me is in sports.
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>> maybe the other country might want to accept -- >> i know lots of people who come from different countries. >> so should we stay or should we go? >> at the moment we can trade freely inside the eu. i think our economy might suffer. >> if we're in the eu, we have the protection of all the other countries in the eu. >> we'd be really unpopular if we left. >> okay. brilliant. that was fantastic. >> some smart kids there, right? thanks for your company. i'm rosemary church. remember to connect with me anytime on twitter @roim cnn. early start is next for our viewers here in north america. for everyone else, stay tuned for more news with max foster in london. you have a great day.
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donald trump just hours from unleashing new attacks on hillary clinton, accusing the former secretary of state of corruption while on the job. where will he hit the hardest? >> he's written a lot of books about business, they all seem to end in chapter 11. >> hillary clinton calls donald trump dangerous for the economy, making dire predictions of an economy rigged for wall street. and new information about what the gunman in the orlando gay club shooting was doing hours before the

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